Big News!!

Good morning from the cold, cloudy and breezy Eastern Shore of Maryland!  It sure feels more like April than June around here.  Osprey Girl and her friends are at the beach for a week.  I can’t help but wonder what a bunch of 17 and 18 year olds do at the beach when it is 59 and rainy, but I guess I really don’t want to know.  She will be off on her own in a couple of months anyway, so I guess I need to worry about something else, like baby ospreys!

What did I say?  Baby ospreys?  But the window for Tom and Audrey’s eggs to hatch has passed, you say!  Do you all remember the title of my last blog, “It’s Not Over Till It’s Over”?  Well, our dear friend and osprey expert Dr. Paul Spitzer came up with a remarkable idea, although to him, it was just another day in the osprey world.  During his many years as an ornithologist, Dr. Spitzer has conducted many, many scientific studies.  Early on in his career, he was studying the effects of DDT on raptor eggs and survivability.  As a major part of his study, he moved eggs and chicks from nests in Connecticut to nests in the Chesapeake Bay, and vice versa.   The survivability of the chicks that were moved from nest to nest was excellent.  According to Dr. Spitzer, the parenting instinct of ospreys is mighty fine, even for chicks that are not their own.  He suggested that we place a foster chick in Tom and Audrey’s nest, and see what happens.  Dr. Spitzer is quite confident that Tom and Audrey will make great foster parents.  Additionally, he feel it would be a shame to waste all of the technology that is in place to be able to watch our nest.  So here is a Facebook post that was just entered onto the Chesapeake Conservancy’s site:

The Chesapeake Conservancy has been in touch with several government agencies and raptor biologists about the possibility of Tom & Audrey fostering chick(s). Each year, a growing number of osprey construct nests on navigational markers, boat docks, bridges, airport communication beacons and numerous types of other elevated structures near water, including cell towers. In some cases, according to Craig Koppie, USFWS Raptor Biologist at the Chesapeake Bay Field Office in Annapolis, Maryland, these nest locations may pose a safety risk to the pair or their young or may interfere with 911 emergency communications. If there is a problematic or nuisance nest that is deemed a hazard and meets the requirements for nest removal, efforts are made to relocate either eggs or young to foster nests if opportunities become available. The word is out in that community that Tom & Audrey could be great foster parents.

We are standing by to facilitate should this possibility come to fruition. Stay tuned!

Now, as you all know, there are no guarantees when it comes to Mother Nature and her stubborn ways.  But this is certainly a wonderful development.  And if we have success, may I suggest the name of Annie or Oliver, two other famous orphans?  We will keep you all posted!

In the meantime, we remain-

Crazy Osprey Man, Mrs. Crazy Man and Osprey Girl

Here is our first contestant for the “Where In The World Are Tom and Audrey?” contest:

Fran+, blog commentor extraordinaire, watching the ospreycam from Maryland

Fran+, blog commentor extraordinaire, watching the ospreycam from Maryland

If you are enjoying the osprey camera and blog, please consider a donation to the Chesapeake Conservancy so they are able to continue supporting programs such as this one.  Go to http://chesapeakeconservancy.org today.  Thanks very much.

493 thoughts on “Big News!!

  1. Just found (by accdent) a fabulous article by ‘our’ Dr. Paul Spitzer! It’s on blog.explore.org. Explore is a philanthropic media organization. Here’s the site: http://blog.explore.org/osprey-expert-paul-spitzer-on-nestlings/ Dr. Spitzer answers a lot of the questions I’ve seen posted here. Enjoy!! (It may take a bit before it shows up here because it contains a web address…). Funny, he evens explains osprey guano… 🙂

  2. Thanks, Susan! Great news. I was getting relaay worried. I picked random times to check in hopes of catching sight of them.

  3. RAINING ON MISS AUDREY, AND THE CHILDREN, I KNOW SHE HAS THOSE BABIES WRAPPED UP TIGHT !! PRAYERS THAT EVERYTHING WILL BE ALRIGHT !!~~~I WOULD GLADLY HOLD AN UMBRELLA IF I COULD !!

  4. BILL C, I VISITED THE UK SITE TODAY, AND I AM AMAZED THAT THE CHICKS JUST STOOD THERE, AND ALLOWED MOM TO FEED THEM, ONE AT A TIME. AMAZING, SHE HAD A WHOLE FISH, IT IS REALLY HARD WORK TO WORK WITH A WHOLE FISH. IT WAS AMAZING . I CHECKED EARLIER, THEY ARE ALL ASLEEP, MOM INCLUDED, IN A ROW. A CHICK, MOM, THEN A CHICK, THEN A CHICK, OH YEAH THE SONG GOOD ONE. POINT OF THIS IS I HAVE NEVER SEEN THIS BEHAVIOR ON OUR SITES IN TH STATES. DO YOU SUPPOSE THAT THEY ARE USING PROPER ENGLISH BEHAVIOR ?? SERIOUSLY NO SOUND, BUT VERY PROPER BEHAVIOR. TOMORROW MAY BE A DIFFERENT STORY !! THANKS FOR SHARING THIS !!

    • Good morning everyone,
      I’m getting the same post over and over and none of the new ones. Is anyone else having this problem?
      Have a wonderful day 🙂
      Thank you!

  5. 6:30am TGIF – Audrey just got done feeding herself and the babies. She left a portion of the fish on the edge of he nest and settled down over the babies. Tom landed on the nest, and took the remainder of the fish and was on his way. Audrey chirped for a minute or so and I could hear response chirping when she stopped “thanks so much for the breakfast, Hon!” ……. “It’s all about you and the babies, darling!”

  6. Just saw Tom bring breakfast and Audrey feed the babies! She would give the larger one a bite, then she made sure the smaller one got a bite, then she took a bite…….the feeding went this way much of the time; I was so glad to see she made sure each chick got some fish! So sweet! Once they were done Tom came and took away what little fish was left…Beautiful morning on the Bay…..

  7. Now two falcon babies at the nest! One is in the nest, one sleeping on the other side of the fence….both growing so fast! Many feathers, and they have their spotted pattern visible on their chest…..Will keep looking for the third one to come into view, hope to catch a feeding….Hope brother falcon is doing well.

  8. SOMEONE ASKED THE OTHER DAY WHY DID TOM TAKE AWAY THAT FIRST FISH, WHEN SHE WOULD NOT FEED THEM OR HERSELF. THAT HAS BEEN NORMAL PROCEDURE, THEY NORMALLY DO NOT LEAVE IT LAYING AROUND. THEY USUALLY NEED MORE BUT IN THIS CASE WITH ONLY THE TWO, IT SEEMS TO BE WORKING SO FAR, HE IS PROVIDING ENOUGH AT DIFFERENT TIMES. I CAN’T WAIT TO SEE IF SHE WILL LET HIM FEED THEM, AS HAS BEEN DONE IN THE PAST, BUT THIS IS BY ALL MEANS A NEW BALL GAME. I AM SO RELIEVED TO SEE THAT THINGS ARE RUNNING SMOOTHLY . IT IS COOLER HERE, SO I AM SURE IT FEELS GOOD THERE THIS MORNING, I COULD HERE THE RAIN THERE, AS WELL AS HERE LAST NIGHT, AND A LOT OF IT .

    • Just wondering if there was a reason why the 3rd egg was left in the nest when the babies were placed there. Donna

  9. Just checked in with the falcons. It appears there are 2 or 3 of the chicks all huddled together sleeping. If you look closely, under the beam, you can see two sets of parents talons (orange).

  10. DONNA, I WAS THE ONE WANTING THE THIRD EGG REMOVED, BUT OBVIOUSLY THE PROFESSIONALS KNEW BETTER THAN I DID, BUT IT HAS NOT BEEN EXPLAINED, THAT I KNOW OF. I AM SURE THEY WILL, AS THEY DO ABOUT EVERYTHING !! I TEND TO GET ALL LET’S FIX IT MODES. THANK GOODNESS FOR THOSE WHO DO KNOW NOT TO GET THAT WAY . I HUMANIZE IT TOO MUCH !!

    • Thanks, I am a little concerned since Audrey is such a good Mom she will continue thinking she can hatch that last egg. Love the new babies!

  11. Donna, my guess is that the egg was left behind so as not to confuse the parents since the shock of returning to two 10-day old babies would be bewildering enough – that’s just speculation since no one discussed the whys. I’ve also wondered what happens to the unviable egg once the shell breaks. Do the parents consume it to replenish their calcium stores?. My birdfeed supplier often recommends baking my spent chicken eggshells, finely crushing them, and mixing it in with my bird food to provide them with calcium. I have never tried it though.

    • Thank you Kathy,
      I figured it out. I guess I kept the same email notification too long on my phone opening the same one each time. Guess it gets full or something, not tech savvy. I deleted that one, now all is well. 🙂

  12. Feeding time! Audrey doing a good job seeing that both are getting some fish. Tom keeping watchful eye.

    • What a sight to see. Wish you all were on line now so you could see Audrey feeding one baby and then the other. How fortunate we are to be able to witness this. It’s priceless!

  13. I enjoy watching Tom attend to the nestorations while Audrey feeds the chicks. It’s as if he has nothing better to do – so cute!

    • My sentiments exactly Angela2! I watched Tom closely last evening after he had brought in a fish and Audrey and the chicks were having “supper”. 😉 He sat on the bottom right corner post (and not by chance or coincidence), he sat there for a long time intensely staring at his mate feeding those sweet chicks (and her downing a few morsels now and then that she wisely deemed to large for the chicks). And I know it’s mentioned often how we (humans) tend to apply our own mannerisms and ways we think etc., to the Osprey world but I swear… after at LEAST 3 or 4 minutes of staring at his family eating, he had a look of pride and… it was like he was finally feeling like he’s suppose to this time of year… like a FATHER (if only a step-Father). Gosh! In my opinion there is not a show on TV that beats THIS. I so enjoy reading all the comments. I have them sent to my email and I thoroughly read every one. I’m just a sick old man all alone and these beautiful birds, along with all of you out there… (the nest-watching “family), you brighten and sweeten my little world. You all help my “world” to open up a bit and oh what joy it all brings to me. I really thank you all for sharing your love for these awesome birds and your thoughts about them with the rest of us. God bless.

  14. ITS A GOOOOD MORNING ..OUR COMPUTER HAS BEEN DOWN FOR 4 DAYS.EVERY MORNING I COME AND SEE OUR MOTHER OSPREY.BUT THIS MORNING I SEE HER WITH THE TWO NEW BABIES I JUST STARTED CRYING FOR I FEEL SOOOO HAPPY NOW THAT SHE AND TOM HAVE BABIES ..
    THANK YOU HUGSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

    • Welcome back RJ.. Yes you have missed a lot …But! there
      is so much more to come.. We are so fortunate to have found
      this sight. I enjoy all the different stages of Audrey and Tom
      raising their Babies, but most of all the first fledging and all
      the wing flapping and nest hopping that precedes the event.
      Blessings to all From a hot and steamy Long Beach Ca.

  15. Congrats and thanks so much for allowing us to view this heartwarming foster family on live camera. Tom and Audrey are wonderful parents.

  16. This is my first year watching the Osprey nest, I got hooked after starting to watch the Falcons. I’m wondering, what is the normal time frame for the parents to “sit” on the chicks? Is it normal to still sit on them after 10 days or is Audrey doing that because they are still “new” to her? Also, I fully realize she’s not hurting them by sitting on them, she’s protecting them, it just seems like they may be getting a little big for her to do that.

    • Ok, I just had another thought, is she still sitting on them because there is an egg still there that she is incubating?

      • Carly – she is also protecting them from the intense sun, heat, rain etc. We seem to be having all of that daily lately in Maryland. Featherdog mentions a wonderful article by Dr. Spitzer (see featherdog, June 18th at 7:19pm above in this blog-chain) so worth it to check it out. It covers things most haven’t even thought of asking, and certainly the repeat questions that keep popping up. Watch out for the guano!!!

  17. Just tuning in to the falcon cam and wow! Someone is setting a different angle on the cam! I can see his hand a bit and his shadow while it is being set and….YES!!! I can now see all three babies, running and flapping their little wings, brother falcon is stretching and mom on top…..The cam is being angled far towards the left side so we can see where they are! Great to be able to see them…

  18. Is anyone watching the falcons right now? Someone is moving the camera around so that we can get a better view of the whole area and the big baby is hopping around and flapping his wings. Quite a sight!

  19. Oh! Now they are still messing w/the angle and now it going back towards left and right! Larger baby seems to be following the person messing w/the cam…..I hope they are done soon!

  20. Right this second, someone is trying to adjust the Peregrine’s cam to show the ledge to the left of the nest box. It’s a long area just like what we could see on the left of the original view. 2 chicks + a parent were on the left; one chick in the box…

  21. Sorry Jeanne & Susan. I didn’t see your posts because the blog didn’t update when I came back to it…

  22. Wow! That’s a scary sight! That is a thin ledge! I wonder why the parent took them all the way down there, I mean I don’t think they are close to going on their own, are they? If one of them gets over zealous when running and flapping, Oh I shutter to think. Still glad they finally moved the camera so we can them 🙂

  23. Is anyone watching the falcon cam right now? The “mother” is flapping her wings like she’s having a fit. The babies are all the way at the end of the wall. I think she’s trying to get them to come to her.

  24. The Falcons are so cool. I can’t believe how fast they developed compared to the Eagles and Osprey chicks. Just this week they went from white furry fuzzballs to looking just about fully developed… The big female wants to get into the air in the worst way.

  25. Thanks for adjusting the camera view on the falcon nest! We now have something to watch! How different the falcons are from the osprey – from parenting habits, feeding habits, etc. What an education we are getting thanks to the Chesapeake Conservancy.

  26. Also, you can help select the falcon baby names by taking a very short survey (see link within the paragraph about the falcons). Some very cool names have been suggested.

  27. Been going back and forth from falcons to osprey. Really attached to these guys in a good kind of way, causing me to be in the moment instead of thinking thoughts of past and future. These birds are teaching everyone a good lesson. What wonderful parents both sets of birds appear to be, and the babies are growing in leaps and bounds! That first falcon flight off the 33rd floor is going to be scary………. Giving gratitude to all of you for bringing us a ray of sunshine to our screens each day!
    Mary in Winston-Salem, NC

    • Kathy, it’s been in the high 90’s in Winston-Salem, however, just had a lovely rain which brought it down to a muggy 74 degrees…….ahhhhhhhh! Loving these birdies, especially the new pair in the osprey nest. Such good parents! Aren’t those baby falcons getting bigger each day? Oh my!

      • WE HAD HUGE RAIN LAST NIGHT, SOIT WAS REALLY NICE THIS MORNING, AND I HEAR RUMBLING OUT NOW. YES, LOVING HOW THINGS HAVE TURNED OUT. SO THANKFUL FOR THE CHICKS, ALL OF THEM , AND THE PARENTS, AND THANKFUL TO GOD FOR LETTING US ENJOY THEM. THEY ARE ALL GROWING SO FAST !1

    • Lori, the other two are hiding. Sometimes all three falcon chicks aren’t in view of the webcam. They changed the angle today to get a longer shot of the rooftop. 33 floors, it’s a long way down! Hope their first flight is successful!

  28. I may have missed an earlier explanation, but how did they get the two baby chicks into the nest and what did they do about Tom and Audrey as they did?

    • Rob, it was magic! Read the older blogs and you’ll discover how the chicks arrived. And even better, check out the “exchange of eggs for babies” on YouTube!

    • Hi Rob – look at the paragraph directly under the cam, it tells a bit about the chicks and where they came from; then click on the more info about the foster chicks (in blue) to read more…you can also see the video of them putting the chicks in the nest.

  29. Amazing sight right now. Both babies being fed by Mom while Dad attends to the nest bowl. Lovely day ending sunlight gleams on this beautiful family. Thanks to all of those involved.

  30. Oh, and I must add that she is making sure BOTH babies are getting plenty to eat. What a wonderful Mother Audrey is. Glorious!

  31. This has been such a busy blog! Angela is exactly right, I believe, about the third egg’s not being removed. Surely Audrey and Tom would have been baffled about what happened to it. As it is, they probably think these are actually their chicks. (Or they don’t care! They’re babies. That’s all that matters.) If you look at other sites with two chicks you’ll often see an unhatched egg. Today, at the Bremen site, I watched the chicks being fed and, when they were full, one of them went over to the remaining egg and snuggled up to it to sleep. I also saw something on the Nature Conservancy Gulf of Mexico site that made me say “Aww-www-www”. Two of the chicks are buddies, the third is Odd-Man-Out and seems so sad and is often alone. Today it went over to Mom and put its head on her foot and then actually reached up to her breast. If it had been human it would have said, “I need a hug!” The female did bend down and pay a little attention.
    About the fate of the infertile egg, watchers from last year, remind me: Wasn’t it the conjecture that one of the parents or a chick had consumed the embryo?
    One thing is obvious about the difference between humans and birds. As humans, we put all our effort into nurturing a sick child. Birds concentrate on feeding the dominant chick, reasoning it will be the survivor. Often, I’ve heard, with smaller birds, they just push the weak babies out of the nest. That’s why the mother osprey didn’t react to the cruelty at the Terrapin site.

  32. Hi all. This is the first year in 4 that I haven’t been able to watch every day. Getting around to being able to watch more now-and happy about it! I’m up to date that we are fostering but any word where the babies came from?? I find it amazing and beautiful that they will foster other chicks. So compassionate.

  33. Thanks, the video was great placing the chicks in the nest, but how did they keep Tom and Audrey away? They never leave the nest for more than a minute.

  34. Kris, just go back to earlier comments and you can learn all about where the eggs came from (Poplar Island), why they were removed and even see how the chicks were placed in the nest. It’s almost beyond belif.

  35. That’s BELIEF! (Time to go to bed. Watching eight osprey sites is wearing me down. But it’s so much fun!)

  36. Rob,
    They also posted a video showing the preparations from a different viewpoint and you can see that they are being circled and dive bombed by Audrey and/or Tom throughout.

  37. Good Morning – Audrey is feeding her babies, but, unfortunately she is giving most of the fish to just one baby. I feel so sorry for the other little one. He/she is trying so hard to get a bite of the fish but Audrey is focusing mainly on the larger of the two.

  38. It is so incredible to watch the young chicks as they stand up and look out over the vast new world that they see.
    And to watch Audrey–such a loving and caring mother.

  39. Thanks so much, Karen! The process took much longer than i thought. It looks as though he was actually looking right down into the nest.

  40. Nancy, unfortunately ’tis ever thus. The focus is on the dominant chick, probably because it is seen as the survivor.The other is deemed expendable. Audrey did the same thing last year and we were afraid we were going to lose the weaker one. It finally stepped up to the plate and became more aggressive. It survived but stayed in the nest longer before it left for South America.

    • Thank you for the information, Jane. This is my first year of watching, and I’m not getting anything done around here!
      We have an osprey nest on the end of our pier and our babies are about 10 days older than Audrey’s. We had the nest put up last year, but no babies. I’m not even sure if there were any eggs in the nest. I can watch our nest but can’t really see inside of it, so I love watching the osprey cam so I can get a better idea of what’s going on in our nest.

Comments are closed.