Big News!!

Good morning from the cold, cloudy and breezy Eastern Shore of Maryland!  It sure feels more like April than June around here.  Osprey Girl and her friends are at the beach for a week.  I can’t help but wonder what a bunch of 17 and 18 year olds do at the beach when it is 59 and rainy, but I guess I really don’t want to know.  She will be off on her own in a couple of months anyway, so I guess I need to worry about something else, like baby ospreys!

What did I say?  Baby ospreys?  But the window for Tom and Audrey’s eggs to hatch has passed, you say!  Do you all remember the title of my last blog, “It’s Not Over Till It’s Over”?  Well, our dear friend and osprey expert Dr. Paul Spitzer came up with a remarkable idea, although to him, it was just another day in the osprey world.  During his many years as an ornithologist, Dr. Spitzer has conducted many, many scientific studies.  Early on in his career, he was studying the effects of DDT on raptor eggs and survivability.  As a major part of his study, he moved eggs and chicks from nests in Connecticut to nests in the Chesapeake Bay, and vice versa.   The survivability of the chicks that were moved from nest to nest was excellent.  According to Dr. Spitzer, the parenting instinct of ospreys is mighty fine, even for chicks that are not their own.  He suggested that we place a foster chick in Tom and Audrey’s nest, and see what happens.  Dr. Spitzer is quite confident that Tom and Audrey will make great foster parents.  Additionally, he feel it would be a shame to waste all of the technology that is in place to be able to watch our nest.  So here is a Facebook post that was just entered onto the Chesapeake Conservancy’s site:

The Chesapeake Conservancy has been in touch with several government agencies and raptor biologists about the possibility of Tom & Audrey fostering chick(s). Each year, a growing number of osprey construct nests on navigational markers, boat docks, bridges, airport communication beacons and numerous types of other elevated structures near water, including cell towers. In some cases, according to Craig Koppie, USFWS Raptor Biologist at the Chesapeake Bay Field Office in Annapolis, Maryland, these nest locations may pose a safety risk to the pair or their young or may interfere with 911 emergency communications. If there is a problematic or nuisance nest that is deemed a hazard and meets the requirements for nest removal, efforts are made to relocate either eggs or young to foster nests if opportunities become available. The word is out in that community that Tom & Audrey could be great foster parents.

We are standing by to facilitate should this possibility come to fruition. Stay tuned!

Now, as you all know, there are no guarantees when it comes to Mother Nature and her stubborn ways.  But this is certainly a wonderful development.  And if we have success, may I suggest the name of Annie or Oliver, two other famous orphans?  We will keep you all posted!

In the meantime, we remain-

Crazy Osprey Man, Mrs. Crazy Man and Osprey Girl

Here is our first contestant for the “Where In The World Are Tom and Audrey?” contest:

Fran+, blog commentor extraordinaire, watching the ospreycam from Maryland

Fran+, blog commentor extraordinaire, watching the ospreycam from Maryland

If you are enjoying the osprey camera and blog, please consider a donation to the Chesapeake Conservancy so they are able to continue supporting programs such as this one.  Go to http://chesapeakeconservancy.org today.  Thanks very much.

493 thoughts on “Big News!!

  1. Congrats COFamily & Chesapeake Conservancy on a successful Adoption!! I had a hard time finding it on Chesapeake’s web page so, here is the you tube video site followed by Chesapeake’s article site. The pix are great but can’t be posted here. Here is the text…

    http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/News/osprey-pair-featured-on-chesapeake-conservancy-webcam-foster-two-chicks
    Article:
    Osprey Pair Featured on Chesapeake Conservancy Webcam Foster Two Chicks
    June 17, 2015
    Annapolis, MD ­ The Chesapeake Conservancy today announced that Tom & Audrey, a nesting pair of osprey who make their Maryland home along the shores of Kent Island, have accepted two foster chicks in their nest.

    Tom was a new mate for Audrey this year, and they had three eggs that were not viable. This is not uncommon for first year mates. Dr. Paul Spitzer, an ornithologist with more than thirty years of experience working with ospreys, was consulted about the nonviable eggs. He was the first to suggest the possibility of Tom and Audrey becoming foster parents, a practice he has had great success with in the past.

    The Chesapeake Conservancy contacted Craig Koppie, raptor biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Chesapeake Bay Field Office, about the potential of Tom and Audrey fostering chicks should there be a need to relocate chicks from an illfated nest in the Chesapeake Bay region.

    Mr. Koppie observed Tom & Audrey’s behavior via the webcam and visited their nest site. As Tom and Audrey continued to incubate the nonviable eggs, Mr. Koppie made the determination that they presented an excellent fostering situation. However, an opportunity needed to present itself and that would be dependent on a variety of conditions. Chicks would have to be no older than two weeks but preferably in the 1014 day period.

    In May, the USFWS removed two eggs located on a piling where barges tie up at Poplar Island, an area deemed unsafe with a lot of disturbance, and placed them in a neighboring nest also on Poplar Island which was already home to three eggs. The Service’s intention was to relocate two or three chicks from this nest if all the eggs hatched. All five eggs were incubated by the female osprey in this nest and she successfully hatched four. One egg was either removed by a predator, or more likely disposed of by the osprey during incubation. Mr. Koppie determined that a foster parents nest would be necessary, as four young chicks are a heavy load to raise successfully.

    USFWS biologists Peter McGowan and Robbie Callahan conduct annual bird population surveys on Poplar Island where there is a robust osprey population. On June 16, 2015, Mr. Koppie, Mr. McGowan and Mr. Callahan went to the donor nest location and saw that all four chicks were doing well. An assessment was made to take the two chicks with the greater weight and body condition.

    During the morning of June 17, 2015, the two foster chicks were placed in Tom and Audrey’s nest. With great anticipation, the parents flew back to the nest to find they indeed “hatched” young after all. Tom and Audrey readily accepted the foster chicks as their own.

    “We currently have about 8,000 visitors a day from around the world viewing the Chesapeake Conservancy’s osprey and falcon webcams. It’s been a real cliffhanger this season for those watching Tom and Audrey, filled with ups and downs. There’s a new ‘Tom’ this year. There was joy and then sadness with nonviable eggs. Now, there’s an opportunity for Tom and Audrey to help by fostering two chicks that were removed from an illfated nest,” Joel Dunn, president and CEO of the Chesapeake Conservancy, said.

    “This pair was incredibly determined to hatch and rear young. I am glad to see that a solution was possible, and it was done in a collaborative manner that was a win for wildlife and our ospreycam viewing public,” Craig Koppie, raptor biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Chesapeake Bay Field Office, said.

    “This is the first time in twenty years that we did not have at least one egg hatch in our nest. It has been very hard for us to look out our window every day and see Tom and Audrey so diligently sitting on their eggs through wind, rain and blistering heat when we knew the eggs were no longer viable,” Crazy Osprey Family (a moniker used for the homeowners who host Tom and Audrey’s nest, so that they may remain anonymous), said.

    “We were so encouraged by Dr. Spitzer’s suggestion to find a foster chick for our faithful osprey pair. The fact that he has been so successful in transferring eggs and chicks during his DDT studies was a great comfort to us. We are also so fortunate to have Craig Koppie’s expertise, enthusiasm and positive attitude, which allowed Tom and Audrey the chance to raise a family this season. Finally, many thanks to the dedicated folks at the Chesapeake Conservancy for putting all the pieces together to make this happen,” Crazy Osprey Family, continued.

    The public may view Tom & Audrey and the two foster chicks on the Chesapeake Conservancy’s osprey webcam at http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/ospreycam, and read the entertaining “Osprey Camera Blog” written by the Crazy Osprey Family.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also maintains an osprey webcam at Masonville Cove available at http://www.fws.gov/chesapeakebay/OspreyCam/index.html.

    After removing them from the donor nest, the osprey chicks were fed and cared for by Mr. Koppie. He needed fresh fish to maintain their body fluids and nutritional requirement until the transfer the following day. Generously, Mr. Tom Collins of Kool Ice & Seafood Co., Inc. in Cambridge, Maryland, kindly donated a bag of fresh menhaden for the osprey. He too, has an attachment for them since he watches a nest near his home.

    The Chesapeake Conservancy extends our special thanks to Craig Koppie, Peter McGowan, Robbie Callahan and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Chesapeake Bay Field Office, Investigative Options Inc., for installing, setting up and maintaining the camera; Skyline Technology Solutions, for managing the video stream, and “The Crazy Osprey” family who generously host the platform and equipment and write the blog.

    Found on every continent except Antarctica, osprey (Pandion haliaetus) are one of the Chesapeake’s most amazing birds for a number of reasons. They migrate thousands of miles each year to and from Central and South America, mate for life, and return to the same spot year after year, despite spending the winter apart from each other.
    After an almost 90% decline in population from 19501970, osprey populations have rebounded due in large part to conservation efforts and the banning of DDT. Osprey can be a valuable indicator species for monitoring the longterm health of the Chesapeake Bay because their diet consists almost entirely of fish and they are sensitive to many environmental contaminants. To make sure these magnificent Bay residents continue to thrive, we are working to ensure that river corridors remain protected and that the Chesapeake Bay can support abundant fish populations.

    To learn more about osprey and the Bay’s other amazing creatures use our National Wildlife Refuge App, or visit the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail managed by the National Park Service where you can see many osprey.

  2. I watched the video, he seemed like he was feeling around for the eggs and felt 2 and not the 3rd…. why would she NOT feed the babies if she had the fish RIGHT there?…….what happened to the fish? Her back was to the camera the entire time, so I thought she fed them and I just didn’t see her…… this is miserable…..

    • One theory (on FB) – if Audrey thinks they are newborns… they wouldn’t be fed yet (makes sense!)… (I had to take a break… so I didn’t see…) 🙂

      • The third (unhatched) egg shouldn’t be a problem… it will soon crack or become part of the nest.

      • THE CHICKS START TO EAT IMMEDIATELY AS BEST I REMEMBER, NO WAITING PERIOD, THAT EGG IS NOT GOING TO HATCH, BY THE TIME IT CRACKS, THEY WILL BE DEAD, BECAUSE SHE IS TRYING O MAKE THE THIRD CHICK COME. THE EGG NEEDS TO GO. I AM NOT AN EXPERT, BUT IT MAKES SENSE TO ME. SHE IS FIXATED ON THAT EGG, THE ONLY CHANGE THEY HAVE IS IF TOM COMES AND FEEDS THEM.

      • Can we Please get an expert to give their opinion? The emotions going on are exausting because we don’t truly understand what’s happening. We went two months, then extreme sadness, then elation, now serious uncertainty. Not eating all day just can’t be right. I saw the fish, a big fish at that, right there in front of Audrey and she didn’t touch it! And why on earth did Tom come and take it back?! He didn’t give her much time at all. I mean I know they are used to one flying in and one flying out to eat, but I thought this was a natural occurrence and Audrey should know to feed her babies!

  3. So thrilled to see the new chicks but…… now I sort of wish there was a “fast forward” button. The suspense is makin’ my stomach hurt. 😀 Good luck Tom & Audrey.

  4. Tom just delivered fish. Audrey eating, while chicks in background pecking at one another. I hope Audrey will feed them!

  5. WHEW!!! Finally. 🙂 I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry so I did some of both! Ha! I think things are gonna be alright.

  6. Oh my goodness! Two chicks in the nest! A friend called to tell me to check the osprey cam. I set up my iPad next to my computer here at the office and am bursting with excitement. New life in the nest! Thanks be to God. I trust that this is a blessing to two chicks who might not otherwise have had this chance at life! What a marvelous age this is, that instant communications can make such things possible!

  7. Unfortunately, I missed the feeding. By the looks of the nest, the chicks have settled down so they must have had a few bites of fish from Audrey.

  8. This is so tough to watch. The fish was huge but Audrey ate a lot before she began feeding them so it appears they were not really full and the dominant one even began fighting with the weaker one. I was so happy that the little guy finally got around so they were positioned somewhat equally. Maybe Tom will come back after 7:00 so they can sleep through the night with full tummies.

    • The babies appear to be resting comfortably and mom Audrey has nodded off a few times, poor dear – she’s exhausted! By all accounts, they have had their fill for now…

    • Yes – looked like both chicks ate well, Audrey ate well, and both chicks pooped! Both chicks had nice crops when she tucked them in too! (We can all sleep tonight!) 🙂

      • BONNIE, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR LETTING ME KNOW THAT EVERYONE ATE, I SURE WISH SHE WOULD LEAVE THAT EGG ALONE, AND CALM DOWN, PRAYING FOR THAT TO HAPPEN, AMONG OTHER THINGS.

  9. Please inform posters to refrain from using all CAPS. It is inappropriate ‘Net’etiquette and denotes shouting or yelling and is rude. CAPS also reduces shape contrast of letters making it difficult to read. All CAPS are fine in contexts such as logos, or acronyms and abbreviations.

    • If you click on the Conservency logo at the top left on the same page as the cam, you will see the story at the top left of the page 🙂

    • ANGELA2 YOU NEED TO KNOW I HAVE ARTHRITIS IN MY HANDS IT IS MUCH EASIER FOR ME TO TYPE AND SEE IN ALL CAPS. I KNOW WHAT IT DENOTES, BUT I AM NOT YELLING, AND I AM NOT RUDE. I KNOW THE ETIQUETTE, BUT THIS IS MY HANDICAP, NOT YOURS TO DEAL WITH. SORRY IF YOU ARE OFFENDED. I HOPE YOU NEVER HAVE ANYTHING LIKE I HAVE.

      • No matter what your reasons Kathy, many users find it difficult to read, including me. Thank you.

      • Kathy, I for one am sorry for your challenge, and completely understand. I have a good friend with arthritis in her hands as well and it can be be difficult. After your explanation I’m sure EVERYONE will understand 🙂

      • Kathy, there is a way to enlarge the print on your computer to make it easier for you to read text as you type it. As for arthritis – I know the disability very well, unfortunately. Thank you.

  10. I just found the article on the conservancy site about the placement of the chicks, and watched the video where they took out two eggs, and put the two babies in the nest…..It said there were four in the nest they were taken from and all four were doing well, so they took the two that weighed the most and brought them to Tom and Audrey……If they were doing well, why take them? I am happy for Tom & Audrey, but still am concerned about taking chicks doing well out of a nest and putting them in another. I also worry about Audrey and Tom, they will have been on the nest much longer now than they would have been if their eggs had hatched…..I hope they all do well and will be ok!

    • Hi Susan, After reading your comment I think I found something that will ease your worry. You were concerned as to why healthy chicks would be taken from a nest. The article said… because there were FOUR chicks it was necessary to take some of them as four chicks are too heavy a load to raise successfully. I’m sure you’ll agree it was a win-win situation for A., an over-loaded nest, B., an Osprey couple (Tom & Audrey) SOOO desiring a family to raise and B., all the awesome Cam watchers that were hoping to get to see chicks raised and to fledge right before our eyes. Hope this helps. 🙂 RC

  11. Someone on FB reported that the babies were fed about 6pm and fed well, their crops were full as well, someone else said. So don’t worry Kathy, it will be okay! I’m sure Tom and Audrey had a bit of a shock getting two chicks together after so long and I think it was right to leave the other egg, not sure if the Osprey can count but remove two eggs and add two babes, makes more sense, it keeps things in balance. This is so wonderful and exciting to be able to share in this amazing story of nature. Thank you COF for everything you’ve done to make this happen, I think you may be making history too, I can’t imagine this is happening anywhere else and “live” by webcam.

  12. Hi Susan, it is said a larger clutch has less of a chance of survival because as the chicks grow their fish consumption/requirements often exceed the parents ability to provide plenty for all. As is often the case, one chick is born so late (the runt) that sometimes it cannot compete with it’s larger siblings and will become weak for lack of food, and die. I’m sure there are other factors that influence survival of a large clutch. Maybe someone else here can provide additional information.

    • Audrey just got up to stretch for a moment and clearly those babies have been fed well, they both look like they’re in a food coma! they didn’t move an inch. So so very sweet!

  13. Hi everybody! If you want to see the you tube video and read the Chesapeake Coservancy’s facebook post, scroll back up through the comments to mine (Featherdog) June 17, 2015 at 4:45pm. It took a bit to get posted because of the links in it.. BTW Mrs. Com, I am very pleased I was able to get the you tube video to appear on the blog! Were you able to video the whole process? Can you share it with us? I’m so-o-o jealous! Thanks!

  14. I’m so happy we have babies!!❤️❤️I hope we can all adjust to each other, sooner rather then later!! Thank you for all your wonderful work!

  15. Thanks, Featherdog, for your posting. I found it initially,but when I went back I was unable to locate it! Now I can look at it over and over. It’s fascinating.

    The Nature Conservancy chicks on the gulf of Mexico site are almost as big as their mom. Surely they will fledge soon..

  16. Worked late and cannot check the internet during the day – all during dinner kept saying – must check Audrey and Tom, must check Audrey and Tom – WOO HOO!!! (yes, that was yelling…..). I have had to read everything – see the videos. I can now feel some peace. Audrey has been so attentive, and Tom even landed on the nest within the first few minutes of my viewing in. For all the people chiming in – if you have been a regular watcher since this nesting pair started their journey Tom has always gone above and beyond the call of duty. He was around day and night, and how many times have we seen him attempt to push Audrey off the eggs, so he could put in his time in. It has always been a collaborative effort with these two. I don’t doubt it will continue to be that way.
    Hey, sister Kathy – YOU CAN YELL AT ME ANYTIME YOU LIKE!!!!! YOU HAVE BEEN NOTHING BUT A JOY TO LISTEN TO/READ THESE MANY MONTHS!!!!
    I’m done – be watching faithfully with you all as the new adventure unfolds – coreygirl from maryland…………

    • What an awesome post Coreygirl! Yup, we’ve been in this together since day one, we have bonded with the COF and Tom and Audrey, they seem like part of our family. Heck, in some cases they are our family! we need to respect each other, and take us as we are, as long as respectful of course. I feel like I’ve become part of a whole new family and can’t wait to watch “our” kids grow and see and hear from everyone again next year 🙂

  17. THANK YOU COREYGIRL, AND BELLA AGAIN !!! IT IS NICE TO BE CALLED SISTER, THANK YOU, I TRY TO ENJOY THIS PROCESS, EVEN THOUGH SOMETIMES I GET PANICKED FOR OUR OSPREY FAMILY. I APPRECIATE YOUR KIND WORDS, AND UNDERSTANDING. I DON’T MEAN ANY HARM IT IS JUST HOW IT IS WITH ME, I AM DOING THE BEST I CAN WITH MY CIRCUMSTANCES. I ENJOY THIS PAGE SO MUCH. I ALSO FIND JOY IN OTHERS POSTINGS, IT IS SO FUNNY AT TIMES HOW WE ALL REACT OFF EACH OTHER, IT IS TRULY A GROUP EFFORT, AND IN A WAY FAMILY. I HAVE GREAT RESPECT FOR THE FOLKS THAT MADE THIS POSSIBLE FOR US TO ENJOY. IT IS INDEED A GIFT, TO BE ABLE TO WATCH GOD’S GIFTS TO US. GOING TO SIGN OFF, AND PRAY THAT THINGS WILL GO WELL FROM NOW OWN, WITH OUR NEW LITTLE ONES !! THANKS AGAIN ~~~~~~~~~~SEE YOU’LL TOMORROW !!

  18. 6:30am – quick breakfast I guess – Audrey is nesting, babies are covered – things are a little wet. Man, She’s got a “look” on her face as she scopes the area around the nest……. almost like lasers coming out of her eyes. She looks like “alright, I DARE you to come near this nest” (here we go again having her think like a human). She has the look of an intense raptor which is one of the reasons I love these birds. Does everyone remember how she used to screech and peck at Tom3b when he was new? She was merciless with him at first, and he did not give up!
    Good day all!

  19. THANKS NANCY, AND COREYGIRL, FOR THE MORNING UPDATE, SEEMS AS THOUGH SHE HAS SETTLED DOWN, THANK GOODNESS FOR THAT. IT IS RAINY, AND A LITTLE COOLER, WHICH I HOPE WILL CALM THINGS DOWN EVER MORE. IT IS COOLER HERE IN NC THIS MORNING, BUT IT WON’T LAST LONG. SO THANKFUL THAT THEY HAVE BEEN FED, AND THAT SHE HAS THAT LOOK ON HER FACE !!GOD HAS BLESSED US AGAIN !! MR AND MRS COM, HOPE YOU CAN BREATHE A LITTLE EASIER THIS MORNING. THANK YOU TOM, FOR HANGING IN WHEN TENSIONS WERE HIGH, GOOD JOB , TOM, IT IS FATHERS DAY SOON , AND YOU ARE BEHAVING AS ONE !!~~~

  20. Just saw the chicks for the first time and they were getting fed! So exciting after weeks of disappointment and sadness for Tom and Audrey. I know there was a possibility of getting foster chicks but didn’t realize this would happen so quickly. Thanks to everyone who took part in the chicks transfer including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. You guys are amazing. I will continue to watch the video with amazement and appreciation and follow the growth of the chicks. Never cease to amaze me to see the wonders and beauty of these birds. I can see all the faces of the fellow video watchers smiling this morning!

  21. While Tom and Audrey were trying unsuccessfully to hatch their eggs, I found another Osprey cam site that was pretty nice. This one is in UK (http://www.ospreys.org.uk/webcam/). It’s from Rutland Osprey Project out of Manton Bay. There are three chicks that look like they’re about half way to adult size. It’s a Hi-Def, so the video is very clear. Two cameras – one close-up and one wide-angle. They kept me busy while Tom and Audrey were working on their eggs. Try the link and see another Osprey family grow across the pond. The chicks are getting fed as we speak!

    • Yet another wonderful osprey nest, Bill. I love the wide angle and close up views. The Audubon too, has many cams and most are manned by cam ops, so they are able to zoom in and out, and pan the landscape. Hog Island in Bremen, Maine, is one that I view also. http://explore.org/live-cams/player/osprey-nest The osprey pair, Rachel and Steve, are in to their 4th year (I believe), on camera. This season they produced two chicks with the 3rd egg determined to be non-viable. You can also split your screen (pop-out) to view the nest while blogging with fellow viewers. I haven’t tried it but most viewers seem to use it so they don’t miss the action while commenting.

      Alas, our local Chesapeake couple have their own family to raise, thanks to our conservation biologist, Dr. Spitzer, the Chesapeake Conservancy, et al. There’s still a long way to go to bring their numbers up to where they were before the days of DDT, but the tide is turning as more awareness is brought to the public by conservation groups and the widely popular cams!

      • Humanizing again, but maybe not so much. Tom, has been at the nest how for about 10 minutes. Audrey finally gets up to let him see their kids! She steps aside as if to show how proud she is! I swear that’s what it was because when he first arrived, she was leaning to the side almost as if she was trying to show him, and he was looking down, turning his head from side to side as if trying to see the chicks. Then soon after she got up to give him full view he flew off. These are the cutest babies ever! 🐤🐥

    • What a beautiful area at the UK webcam! Downton Abbey in the background! Did you notice that those adult birds are mottled like our Tom? Maybe he’s an English bird!

  22. Isn’t it amazing to watch these birds? Sigh! I sometimes wish human beings might as “uncomplicated,” if you know what I mean. These two have a job to do… and they do it. They had eggs to hatch and they persevered. Now, despite the fact that humans have been at their nest (some birds might abandon a nest after such an intrusion!) they take up the reins and start taking care of the task at hand. There are chicks to be raised. Tom catches fish. Audrey shelters and feeds the chicks. There’s a wonderful order to it all that has nothing to do with our sentiments. Tom no longer belongs in the nest. It’s his job to catch fish. And he eats first, because if he’s not strong and well nourished, nobody else will eat. Audrey gets fed next. She’s got the instincts to feed the chicks, but again: if she’s not fed and well nourished, the chicks won’t get fed, so she has to eat next. And in terms of species survival, an adult female can produce more chicks in the future, so Mama has to be “programmed” for survival, right. I do recall that some of us who watch last year — like Kathy and the Fuller Sisters… So nice to have this continuity of community! — stressed a little about that until Mrs. COM reminded us that there was a underlying order that makes great sense in the bigger picture. By the way, I’m so glad that the Crazy Osprey Family and Mrs. COM’s delightful blog got well-deserved “kudos” in the Chesapeake Conservancy write up of this adoption. I don’t know about anyone else, but I marvel at what they’ve done/are doing… for the sake of the Ospreys (raising public awareness and interest) and for our emjoyment. Just think: they could simply be enjoying the osprey nest off the edge of their lovely property. Instead, they invite the world to share the enjoyment, going above and beyond even that generosity to provide running commentary and photographs to fill in the picture beyond the Osprey cam through this blog. Mrs. COM not only writes entries, but answers our questions and takes the time to simply be kind and encouraging. There’s nothing else quite like this. I’ve never done any bird watching before… grew up in New York City. Was always focused on things that occur in the “Great Indoors” (art museums, performing arts, libraries, et al.) My life is certainly richer for this opportunity. Thanks to all of you whose postings help to make it a community! Blessings to you.

    • Thank you Fran for bringing me/us back to reality .. What a
      blessing we have ..to have found this wonderful sight and
      to have people like you who contribute wonderful info for
      us to ponder on. instead of complaining you get right to the
      point and for that I am grateful .. I know nothing about the
      Osprey except what I have learned in the two years I have
      been watching and it didn’t dawn on me that Audrey would
      not let Tom share in the baby duties HUMMM ! Doesn’t she
      get weak not exercising those magnificent wings? last year
      it was hard to tell who was in the nest both parents looked
      similar. I thought they took turns… and last but not least
      Kathy I have no trouble reading the type you use in fact
      it is easier for me to read and maybe we all should go to
      CAPS .. I TREASURE THE RELATIONSHIP WE ALL
      HAVE FORMED AGAIN THANK YOU!!!! FROM WAY
      TO SUNNY LONG BEACH CA.

  23. VERY WELL SAID FRAN,I WELL REMEMBER THE LESSON ON THE PECKING ORDER ON FOOD, IT ALL MAKES PERFECT SENSE . I AM HOPING THINGS GO WELL FOR ALL CONCERNED, AS WE CONTINUE TO ENJOY THIS ADVENTURE. MANY THANKS TO THE CRAZY OSPREY FAMILY, AND MRS COM. THANKS FOR ALL YOUR COMMENTS, KEEP THEM COMING. WE ALL SEE THINGS AT DIFFERENT TIMES OF THE DAY, SO IT WORKS OUT RATHER NICELY WHEN IT ALL COMES TOGETHER. BLESS EVERYONE.S HEART, IF YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN !!~@@

  24. The baby Osprey chicks just had a “battle royale” Incredible to watch the sibling rivalry take place amongst all the other drama.

    • Yes, but gees, he/she beat the heck out of its sibling and I watched and am still watching and that other one never got up! Audrey even looked at it very closely and then layed down over it leaving the obnoxious one out! I pray that little one is okay.

  25. I thought maybe he had been put in ‘time out’! The smaller one looked up just now when she stood; hopefully it will get enough each day to grow and keep up. How did Audrey’s feather get put awry? Did she get in the middle of the brawl?

    • No she didn’t get in the middle of it, she just stood to the side and watched. Her feather was like that already, I can’t imagine how it got that way. Poor thing.

  26. I watched this behavior with the eaglets and when one gets a good blow to the other the one recieving the blow will play dead and lay down to end the fight. After a few minutes the one laying down gets back up like nothing ever happened.

  27. I noticed yesterday that one chick is very aggressive. The poor sibling was being picked on quite a bit. I didn’t notice this behavior last year to this degree. I got concerned also when the the little one fell over and stopped moving. Nice to know that this is just “playing dead” or saying “uncle” to stop the beating.

  28. BELLA, AND BARBARA, I NOTICED THAT WHITE FEATHER LAST NIGHT, I SUPPOSE SHE GOT HER TAIL FEATHER OUT OF WHACK YESTERDAY. I DON’T SEE HER WHITE FEATHER ON HER BACKSIDE, ANYMORE.IF EVER THERE WAS A TIME TO GET YOUR TAIL FEATHERS OUT OF WHACK YESTERDAY, WAS IT , ALL THE WAY AROUND. CAN’T WAIT TO SEE WHAT TODAY BRINGS.

  29. Just noticed Audrey’s feathers….hope she is ok, haven’t seen Tom much, but I tend to watch before work, at lunch, and in the evening so maybe I’m just missing him? Hope both babies do well…….No falcons in sight right now, they are too busy these days! Is there a cam or web site for the Poplar Island nest these two baby ospreys came from, so we can see how the other two are doing also? I went on google but didn’t find anything….Alabama ospreys at Wolf Bay are getting so big, what a beautiful backdrop Wolf Bay makes. Ospreyzone cam (featured on Fox5) with their new babies is also a good cam to watch…very close up, saw the babies eat yesterday am before work……..Happy Thursday to all!

  30. Is that a flight feather sticking out on Audrey? I have been watching her for awhile now and she will close her eyes and bow down over babies, looks like something may be bothering her……is she ok? If an osprey expert is reading this, please give some insight…..I am too worried!

  31. It is SO amazing and wonderful to see how Audrey has literally taken these 2 chicks under her wings and treats them exactly like her own babies. It brings tears to my eyes when I think of how my wife and I adopted a 9 mnth old boy, (now 29), and how we loved and raised him the same way… i.e. just as our very own child. What a great experience. PS… Along with so many others, (of the wonderful “nest-watching” family), my heartfelt thanks go out to everyone involved in making this nest cam available to the public. My gosh it’s SOOO awesome!

  32. Many times when Audrey is “bending” down she is taking a nap. Birds can get a good sleep in 30 seconds! They also rest their neck muscles that way. Of course, watching the chicks..Others seemed concerned about the chicks taking so long to be fed–in the article from the CC it was mentioned that the chicks were being fed before they were even put into the nest with fresh menhaden so they would be fine.

    I’m sure both nest chicks will be fine, now the smaller ones in the Poplar nest can get more to eat and I believe the experts took the bigger ones so they would be strong enough to make the trip. I am just so very, very happy that chicks were found!!!! I didn’t think 2 would be placed–was hoping just for one!! I am in great spirits to see they were easily accepted. I’m in 7th Heaven. Can’t use enough exclamation points to describe my excitement! I’ve been busy with family visiting and hadn’t been able to watch and just kept checking in to see if the “big announcement” would happen. I was able to see all the pics and videos on the CC facebook page–WOW!

    Tom and Audrey were flying so close to Mr. K. to protect their nest, I think that is when Audrey’s feathers might have gotten bent out of shape. She could be molting several as well and they came loose during that time. Love to all!

    • Thanks for your post Linda….I am beginning to relax a bit now and enjoy seeing the babies with Audrey and Tom….I hope I can tune in to a feeding soon! I have missed them so far…..

  33. Is Audrey moulting? Maybe that is the reason for the one white feather sticking out. It is such a joy watching her fuss over the two chicks, and a blessing to be able to watch nature renewing itself. I am grateful for the opportunity to be able to share thoughts and comments with fellow bird watchers from all over the country, and world!

  34. Tom brought in a big fish for lunch! Audrey ate a bit and is now feeding the chicks. I don’t think we will have to worry about these parents providing for the youngsters.

  35. Tom flew in to take a peek at the chicks. Audrey was nice enough to get up and show them off. She took a quick fly away and then back again. Thought she was going to relinquish chicks to Tom. Not happening today, so far!

    • Audrey’s feathers have returned to their proper place
      Tom has brought lunch/dinner ..Audrey is letting Tom
      stick around longer .. and she took a fly around
      Little Guys are tucked in for a nap …And all is
      right with the Osprey World..

  36. Tom brought a fish between 4 – 4:30pm – stood by on the nest purveying the kingdom whilst mom fed herself and the babies. Audrey and the babies have settled down (4:50) – was a big meal for the little ones. Big thunderstorms going on in Jessup, Md – Heading East towards the Eastern Shore. Get ready Audrey!!!

  37. LOOKS LIKE THAT STORM IS BLOWING IN, THEY ARE WEATHERING THE WIND RIGHT NOW, TOM, AND AUDREY ON THE NEST. I AM SO PLEASED TO READ OF ALL THE FOOD TOM HAS BOUGHT TODAY, AND THE FEEDING IS GOING WELL. LOVE THAT !!~

  38. Has anyone seen the falcons and their 3 chicks in the last few days? I’ve been checking the Concervancy’s cam 4-5-6 times at all different times of day for the past few days and haven’t seen either adult nor any chick.

    • I saw one falcon chick this morning (about 6:30)came running into view, hopped in the nest box area, preened, and ran back out of view! It was the larger one and had about a 50-50 mix of down and feathers….I then saw the little one, most likely brother falcon! under the ledge and to the right….could just see his top f his head and back….I haven’t seen all 3 in awhile and haven’t seen mom or dad much either…They seem so busy! I’m not sure if they scattered due to being banded and humans in the nest, or if they have just gotten older now and can run, soon be flying, but I miss seeing them! Mom and Dad are such beautiful birds!

Comments are closed.